Webinars

Complete 2018 webinar schedule coming soon, please sign up for our e-mail list for notifications. To view our previous webinars, visit our Remediation Webinar Recordings page. 

Combined Remedies Webinar Series

Achieving remediation site closures can be challenging, time-consuming, and costly. Treatment train approaches or combined remedies are often a practical means to address difficult remediation sites. The optimal approach to soil and groundwater clean-up often requires the use of multiple technologies either sequentially or concurrently to achieve the most cost-effective approach throughout the entire life cycle of cleanup at a project site.

Carus is excited to announce our upcoming webinar series, Combined Remedies. We are fortunate to bring to you five industry experts presenting on various combined remedy topics throughout the upcoming months. Join us for one, two, or all of our 30-minute webinars. 


Combined Remedies Series
Permanganate & Persulfate

May 3, 2018
12-12:30 pm CDT

Presenter: 
Mr. Bruce Marvin, Geosyntec

Further Details Coming Soon

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Combined Remedies Series

Combining Remedial Technologies and Implementation Methods to Address Chlorinated Solvent Impacts at Complex Sites

June 14, 2018
12-12:30 pm CDT

Presenter:
Mike Mazzarese, AST Environmental Inc. 

Summary:
Complex sites require complex solutions.  Challenges typically include heterogeneous geology and contaminant mass distribution, vadose and/or saturated contaminant mass, and concentrations that span several orders of magnitude.  These require us as practitioners to often consider multiple remedial technologies and approaches to reach the site specific goals within the desired timeframes.  Often technologies are inefficiently implemented sequentially; this extends the remediation timeframe and requires re-characterization between remedial phases.  This presentation will highlight several projects where multiple technologies were successfully implemented in concert.  The strategies for each site included different approaches for source and plume remediation.

Site #1: An industrial property utilized chlorinated solvents for equipment maintenance from the 1950’s to 1970’s. Past operations resulted in multiple source areas and it is suspected that chlorinated solvents were discharged to drain pipes into a former settling pond. TCE concentrations have been detected in groundwater at a maximum concentration of 730 mg/L and in soils up to 6,800 ug/g.  Soil blending was performed utilizing chemical oxidation (sodium permanganate) to treat the unsaturated TCE impacts exceeding an average 1,100 ug/g.  BOS 100® was injected into the saturated zone in a barrier configuration to limit the mass flux from the source area and prevent contamination from leaving the subject property.

Site #3: A buried drum of TCE was discovered during site redevelopment.  In situ chemical oxidation via potassium permanganate was used to successfully treat the source area.  Downgradient of the source a permeable reactive barrier was installed via direct push injection in order to decrease the mass flux of the plume encroaching into a wetlands.  Data will be presented from the source remediation as well as from the monitoring wells up and downgradient of the barrier.

Biography:
Mike has been involved with in-situ remediation for seventeen years having worked within the reagent, field services, and environmental consulting community his entire professional career.  His role as Senior Engineer at AST involves project assessment and design, field implementation oversight, and post project data analysis.  Mike is a graduate of Penn State University holding BS and MS degrees in Environmental Engineering.  He has previously worked for Vironex, Regenesis, and URS.  

 

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Landfill Leachate Odor Control Case Study

April 19, 2018
12:00 pm CDT

Presenter: 
Darin Skutt, Carus Corporation

Summary:
Fugitive odors of landfill leachates are problematic. Today, there is much interest in controlling odors released during the collection, handling, and disposal of landfill leachate. While the primary focus of leachate treatment must always be to meet the applicable environmental regulations, fugitive odors cannot be ignored.

Permanganate treatment has been used to effectively and rapidly eliminate the sulfur and nitrogen compounds commonly found in non-hazardous landfill leachate.  This free webinar will discuss the basic chemistry of permanganate treatment and its practical implementation at landfill sites.

Permanganate’s oxidation chemistry is unique in its capability to rapidly eliminate obnoxious and dangerous odor compounds, whether in air or water.  It has been used to control odors from a variety of industries, including food processing, manufacturing plants, and landfills. Permanganate chemistry is easy to implement and use with the availability of concentrated liquid permanganate products such as CARUSOL® liquid permanganate. 

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Passive In Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) of 1,4-Dioxane and Chlorinated VOCs Using Slow Release Chemical Oxidant Cylinders

May 17, 2018
12 pm CDT

Presenter:

Dr. Pat Evans, CDM Smith

Summary:
Many groundwater plumes containing 1-4-dioxane and chlorinated solvents are not being treated to unrestrictive use and require ongoing management. Passive technologies that are capable of providing low-cost and sustained plume management are a pressing need. Slow-release chemical oxidant cylinders are a potential solution to this challenge. Wax cylinders containing sodium persulfate, potassium permanganate, or a mixture of these two oxidants, can be used to intercept a groundwater contaminant plume as a permeable reactive barrier or in a funnel and gate configuration. However, questions exist regarding the effectiveness of this technology. For example, it is not well documented whether the technology is capable of effectively reducing concentrations of 1,4-dioxane and chlorinated solvents in groundwater. Additionally, engineering design parameters such as minimum cylinder spacing are poorly understood.

The Department of Defense Environmental Security Program (ESTCP) funded CDM Smith to conduct a demonstration of this technology and document its cost and performance. The demonstration was conducted at Operable Unit 11 at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California. At this location 1,4-dioxane and chlorinated solvents are present downgradient of the source area at concentrations approaching 10 mg/L each. The demonstration involved simulating a PRB, comparing technology performance to pre-established quantitative performance objectives, and comparing technology cost to various alternatives including pump and treat.

Results demonstrated that use of sodium persulfate oxidant cylinders promoted destruction of 1,4-dioxane and chlorinated solvents (1,2-dichloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethane, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, and trichloroethene) by more than 99% compared to a goal of 90%. Addition of activators was not required to promote chemical oxidation by sodium persulfate. The cylinders continued to release oxidant for at least 6 months and up to one year. Groundwater geochemistry downgradient of the reactive zone returned to natural upgradient conditions. Various cost-scenarios were evaluated and demonstrated the lifecycle cost of the technology was less than pump and treat using advance oxidation or manual periodic injection of aqueous chemical oxidant solutions even when cylinder spacing was as close at 2.5-feet. This study represents the first systematic evaluation of slow-release chemical oxidant cylinders and demonstrated the technology is capable of cost-effective passive plume management.

 

Biography:
Dr. Evans is a Principal with CDM Smith in Bellevue, Washington and has 30 years of research and development experience in the areas of hazardous waste remediation, energy, drinking water treatment, and waste water treatment. Dr. Evans has been a Principal Investigator on numerous research projects including ones funded by the Department of Defense Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP), Department of Energy Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF), and the Water Research Foundation (WRF). He is the recipient of the Water Environment Federation McKee Award, and two Research Grand Awards and one Superior Achievement Award from the American Academy of Environmental Engineers and Scientists. He is the author of over 40 publications and holds 4 patents. He received his B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan and his M.S. degree in chemical engineering from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. He also completed postdoctoral research in environmental microbiology at New York University Medical Center.

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